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  • Workshop Descriptions

    The categories below can be expanded to display the full workshop descriptions for the Pathways to Success program.

     

  • Research Workshops

    These workshops focus on supporting graduate students who are conducting research and producing research papers, theses and dissertations. Collaborating with the library, we offer workshops that will prepare you to write that next paper, from using online library tools to formatting your thesis or dissertation. Additional workshops guide students in applying for graduate research fellowships, presenting and publishing their work, optimizing their online presence, and other topics important for successful researchers.

    Workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall (CNH) room 146 or the John C. Hitt Library room 235A

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCF Student Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Library Research and Literature Review Strategies

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries 

        What strategies are you using to conduct library research? This session highlights effective strategies to locate sources for literature reviews and projects and tips for using citation tracking features, creating alerts to stay updated on publications, and customizing Google Scholar options. An overview of organizing sources using Mendeley and Zotero citation management tools will also be included. Please bring your laptop if you would like to work along with the presentation.

        January 24 - 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        February 22 - 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        March 7 - 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        April 13 - 12:00 p.m. ­– 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Presentation Skills

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries 

        Does the idea of giving a presentation freak you out? I have good news and bad news. Bad news – presentations are unavoidable in your courses and in your future career path. Good news – presentation skills are something you can easily improve! This 45-minute session will provide some tips, tricks, and ideas for how to become a better presenter. There will be time at the end for Q&A (and to practice speaking to a crowd!). Please bring your laptop if you would like to follow along with the presentation.

        January 30, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        February 28, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        March 9, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        April 11, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Where to Publish and Author Rights

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries 

        How do you decide which journals are a best fit for your manuscript? Do you know that all rights to a work are often assigned to publishers when a manuscript is accepted? Learn to be a savvy author! This two-part workshop will cover criteria to consider when planning where to submit your work for publication and basic information about copyright as it pertains to publishing. In Where to Publish we will look at factors like acceptance rates, audience, indexing, cost to publish and open access, among others. The Author Rights section will discuss how author rights are a bundle of rights that may be negotiated by the author. Please bring your laptop if you would like to follow along with the presentation.

        January 25, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        February 22, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        March 22, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        April 4, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Optimizing Your Online Presence

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries 

        Join us for this two in one workshop to learn more about evaluating research impacts and managing your online research profile.

        Part 1: Citation Metrics & Measuring Impact: Citation metrics provide quantitative data used to evaluate the impact of a scholar’s research. Several methods and tools exist to assist scholars with obtaining information about citation counts and impact data, such as ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, and other citation counting tools by discipline. Metrics also assist scholars with identifying key journals and notable researchers in their field. 

        Part 2: Managing Researcher Profiles: In part two of the workshop we’ll discuss why it’s important to develop an online profile as a researcher, how to promote your work and connect to other researchers, and look at several sites in depth. See what ORCID, LinkedIn, Research Gate, Academia.edu, PIVOT, Plum Analytics, and Google Scholar can do for you. 

        Please bring your laptop if you would like to follow along with the presentation.

        January 25, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        February 23, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        March 22, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    EndNote and RefWorks: Citing Made Easy!

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries

        Citation Management Tools allow you to dedicate more time to research! Join us for a hands-on session where you learn how to export citations from library databases, organize citations, generate bibliographies, and format citations in a Word document. Endnote & RefWorks can help make managing your references and formatting citations easy! All sessions cover both tools. Please bring your own laptop if you would like to follow along with the presentation.

        January 27, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        February 6, 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        February 15, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. John C. Hitt Library, 235A
        February 21, 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        March 3, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Finding Data Sources

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries

        What caveats should you be aware of in selecting and using data sources? Discover tips and tricks for locating data using the web and library resources. This session will focus on free and library subscription resources, including Census and American Community Survey sources, American FactFinder, DemographicsNow, SimplyMap, and Social Explorer. Depending on the interests of attendees we may also discuss specific resources for education, social science and international data. Please bring your laptop if you would like to follow along with the presentation.

        February 21, 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        March 23, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Show Me the Money: Identifying and Applying for Graduate Research Fellowships

      • Presented by the College of Graduate Studies

        Learn what it takes to get various funding agencies to show you the money, such as fellowships and other major awards. After taking this session you’ll know how to apply and when, how to compile a strong application including your personal statement and research plan, and finally, we’ll provide you with additional resources needed to take advantage of these opportunities. Don’t let the upcoming application deadlines pass you by! 

        February 9, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Beginning the Thesis or Dissertation

      • Presented by the College of Graduate Studies

        This workshop is intended for graduate students in their first or second term after enrolling in thesis or dissertation hours. Attendees will learn essential information on the entire thesis and dissertation process including the role of the advisory committee, research organization, conducting human subjects research, copyright issues, publishing, formatting requirements, campus resources. 

        March 8, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Completing the Thesis or Dissertation

      • Presented by the College of Graduate Studies

        This question and answer session is intended for graduate students in their final term. Prior to attending, students should review the Completing the ETD page and prepare any questions related to this information and bring them to the workshop. Following the workshop, attendees will understand all of the steps needed to complete the thesis or dissertation process.

        February 21, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Thesis or Dissertation Formatting Using Microsoft Word's Hidden Tools

      • Presented by the College of Graduate Studies

        Attend this workshop to learn tips and pitfalls involved with using Microsoft Word to format an electronic thesis or dissertation. Participants will be shown a demonstration of how to use the following Microsoft Word functions: styles for headings and subheadings, captions for figures and tables, page numbering, automatic generation of the Table of Contents and List of Figures/Tables, converting to PDF with bookmarks. 

        February 21, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        February 28, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        March 8, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    The Basics of Poster Presentations

      • Presented by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning

        Participants in this session will learn how to design, create and deliver a poster presentation.

        March 7, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Useful Apps All Grad Students Should Love and Use

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries

        Do you ever wonder if there is a great app out there that you are missing out on? Need help staying organized, taking notes, or need a better way to communicate with classmates over shared projects? Well look no further as this session will introduce helpful and important apps that all grad students should love and use! We will cover organization, project management, reference, and science apps that will keep you at your best while you are in grad school and beyond. Please bring your mobile device or laptop as we test drive the apps during the presentation.

        February 9, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        March 29, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    IRB Institutional Review Board: Questions and Answers

      • All Human Research conducted by UCF faculty, staff, and students must be reviewed by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and approved for compliance with regulatory and ethical requirements before it may be undertaken. Human Research activities may include a wide variety of procedures such as, but not limited to surveys, interviews and focus groups to the collection of biological samples and clinical trials. Virtual reality simulation research and program evaluation research are also reviewed by the IRB. Research utilizing secondary data, i.e. databases, may also require IRB review and approval when human subjects are involved. Attend this session to have your questions regarding Human Subjects research and the IRB process answered by a representative from the UCF IRB team.

        January 25, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    I-Corps: Learn how to earn NSF funding for your research

      • The Innovation Corps (I-Corps) program, created by the National Science Foundation (NSF), accelerates the commercialization of technologies from laboratories at universities throughout Florida. Attend this session to learn how to streamline your success by understanding how your idea will connect with society. I-Corps provides you with the tools and foundation you need to examine feasibility of your product and prepare it for launch into the marketplace.

        February 6, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Colbourn Hall 146

  • Academic Integrity

    A series of workshops encouraging academic integrity and responsible conduct of research are available to all graduate students. These workshops include the required face-to-face training for incoming doctoral students and the online CITI Responsible Conduct of Research Training Module.

    All workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall room 146.

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCFStudent Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Doing the Right Thing: What Every Graduate Student Should Know about Research Misconduct

      • Dr. Jo Smith – Department of Public Administration  

        CORE WORKSHOP

        This session will briefly summarize the nine core competencies that fall under responsible conduct or research. The remaining session will involve an interactive simulation call “The Lab” where participants will discuss and decide what the simulated character should do next and the possible results of those decisions. The objective of the session is to improve graduate student’s awareness of what areas constitute RCR and to engage in a decision-making process through a simulated scenario. 

        January 17, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
        February 3, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
        April 18, 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

    •    Authorship, Credit and Collaborative Scholarship and Research: Ethical Pitfalls to Avoid

      • Dr. Steffen Guenzel - Writing and Rhetoric
        Dr. Andrew Randall - Civil Engineering

        CORE WORKSHOP

        This workshop will help to clarify rules governing authorship of peer-reviewed publications, with particular focus on archival journals. We will identify issues and decision making with respect to authorship through the instructor’s personal experiences and example case studies. 

        January 17, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (Guenzel)
        February 3, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Randall)
        February 24, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Randall)
        March 24, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Randall)
        April 18, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. (Guenzel)

    •    Data Management: Perils of Fabrication, Falsification, and Confidentiality

      •  Dr. Mark Johnson - Department of Statistics 

        CORE WORKSHOP

        This workshop addresses research misconduct in the form of fabrication of data or experimental outcomes, falsifying data or originality of material (e.g., plagiarism) and breech of confidentially of data as it relates to human subjects or contractual obligations. An historical perspective is given to highlight some infamous examples of misconduct and the ensuing scandals when they were publicized. Some mechanisms for discovery of bogus data will be noted to suggest that ultimately research misconduct will likely be discovered. Some long-term consequences of research misconduct will be identified that demonstrates the paramount importance of maintaining data integrity. 

        January 18, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
        February 17, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
        March 20, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

    •    Ethics: Personal Integrity as a Graduate Student

      • Dr. Nancy Stanlick - Department of Philosophy 

        CORE WORKSHOP

        This workshop is an examination of relevant issues involved in the concept of "integrity" in one's role as a graduate student. Among the issues discussed are professional codes of conduct the meaning of "honor" and personal responsibility. 

        February 7, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
        April 20, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m..

    •    Intellectual and Other Conflicts of Interest: Your Rights and Responsibilities

      • Douglas Backman - Office of Research and Commercialization 

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        This workshop addresses the various conflicts of interest encountered by faculty during their academic and research tenure. The session will address conflicts of interest between faculty and students, financial conflicts of interests related to sponsored research and conflicts of commitments related to faculty members' institutional assignments and their private business or consulting activity. The objective of the session is to make the student aware of the various types of conflicts of interests and the student’s role and responsibilities in mitigating such conflicts. The session will use directed learning and case studies to facilitate decision making scenarios. 

        February 8, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

    •    Intellectual Property Rights

      • John Miner - Office of Research and Commercialization 

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        John Miner from the Office of Research and Commercialization will present this seminar which will address intellectual property rights specifically concerning graduate students and post-doctoral fellows.  

        February 7, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
        March 24, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
        April 11, 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

    •    Ethical and Legal Issues in Teaching

      • Dr. Nancy Stanlick - Department of Philosophy 

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        A discussion of various issues that may and do arise in college and university-level teaching, including disruptive student behavior, academic dishonesty, FERPA, your responsibilities as an instructor or Teaching Assistant. Also included as a central feature is the place of the UCF Creed and UCF Golden Rule as guiding principles. 

        March 22, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    •    How Diverse Attitudes and Perspectives Can Affect You in the Classroom and Workplace

      • Barbara Thompson - Office of Diversity and Inclusion  

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        In the classroom and workplace, situations involving aspects of human diversity may arise that require each of us to reflect on our own biases. This workshop encourages participants to push their views on personal and professional integrity and ethical decision making to their limits. Bring with you flexibility of thought and openness to different attitudes and perspectives as we discuss some challenging scenarios that ask us to decide what is the “right thing to do.”  

        April 18, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

    •    Ethical Decision Making in Graduate School and Beyond

      • Jennifer Wright - Office of Integrity and Ethical Development  

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        Actions taken as a result of a decision made reflects one’s values and principles. Inherently, we know what is right and wrong behavior but do we understand how others judge right and wrong behavior. This seminar will provide problem-solving methods and critical questioning techniques associated with the practice of ethical decision making. During the seminar, participants will have an opportunity to strengthen one’s principles of professional conduct to be able to practice living by a set of ethical standards. 

        February 6, 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
        March 9, 5:00 p.m.  – 7:00 p.m.
        April 14, 3:00 p.m.  – 5:00 p.m.  

    •    A Practical Guide to Preventing Plagiarism

      • Douglas Backman - Office of Research and Commercialization  

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        This session will outline ethical writing guidelines and define commonly found plagiarism practices. The student will gain an understanding of how to prevent plagiarizing another person’s work and learn the proper use of citations when drafting research papers and journals. 

        March 23, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  • Graduate Grantsmanship Workshops

    Facilitated by the Office of Research and Commercialization, this set of five workshops will equip you with the specific knowledge and skills needed to successfully obtain external funding for research. The series will provide content on research sponsors and funding resources, writing research proposals, budget development, common procedures for submitting a proposal, and critical components of award management. Students must complete all five workshops to receive a professional development certificate, but the courses are available to take individually as well. All workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall room 146.

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCFStudent Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

    PLEASE NOTE: The registration for the face-to-face workshops will not be open until Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 9:00 a.m.

    Graduate Grantsmanship Webcourse

    For students unable to attend the face-to-face Graduate Grantsmanship workshops, an Graduate Grantsmanship Webcourse will be offered later this fall. Please see our Online Workshops page for additional details.

    Please Note: Modules within the Graduate Grantsmanship Webcourse cannot substitute for face-to-face workshop attendance and vice versa. In order to complete the series, you must choose to take only face-to-face Graduate Grantsmanship Series workshops OR the Graduate Grantsmanship Webcourse.

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    •    Workshop 1: Research Funding Sponsors and Resources

      • Having the right fit between the research project and the sponsoring agency is critical. This session will focus on the approaches used to identify a potential research sponsor. Participants will search data systems and review sponsors’ websites to determine how well their research aligns with a sponsor’s mission and award history. The session will address how to contact sponsors to ensure interest and improve funding potential. Participants will be asked to identify three funding sources to share at the next session and to bring a copy of a solicitation from one of those three sources.  

        January 30, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

        PLEASE NOTE: The registration for this workshop will not be open until Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 9:00 a.m.

    •    Workshop 2: Steps to Research Proposal Development and Collaboration

      • Failure to follow the solicitation guidelines is one of the major reasons grant proposals are not funded. This session will discuss the common sections of a sponsor’s grant solicitation. Instructions of how to create a proposal outline from the solicitation will be provided. For those interested in obtaining a sample of a funded proposal, instructions on the appropriate process of making a request for a funded proposal will be provided. Participants will be informed about what other considerations need to be identified prior to writing the proposal. In addition, there will be an overview of the unique concerns when collaborating with other researchers and organizations on a research project.  

        February 13, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

        PLEASE NOTE: The registration for this workshop will not be open until Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 9:00 a.m.

    •    Workshop 3: Tips for Grant Proposal Writing

      • It is important to have a good research idea, but being able to clearly articulate the significance, research aims, and describe how the research will be implemented to the reviewer is just as important. The focus of this session is the peer review process and writing the proposal. The session will discuss the peer review process used by the major funding agencies, best practices in preparing a proposal, common sections of a proposal, and how to effectively use graphs and tables.  

        February 27, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

        PLEASE NOTE: The registration for this workshop will not be open until Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 9:00 a.m.

    •    Workshop 4: Budget Development

      • All researchers need sufficient resources to conduct their research, and researchers may not always include all the costs associated with a research project. This session will discuss the major components of a research budget. What are the common types of costs in a budget and determine costs that are allowable by the sponsor. Special considerations will be discussed concerning subcontracting, vendors, consultants, and equipment.  

        March 6, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

        PLEASE NOTE: The registration for this workshop will not be open until Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 9:00 a.m.

    •    Workshop 5: Awards Management

      • Successfully implementing a grant award is important in establishing a long-term relationship with the sponsor. Often researchers are funded by the same funder multiple times. This final session will focus on the key issues in managing an externally funded research project. The session will cover issues such as: what types of items require negotiation, process for an award setup, considerations when hiring, and other important factors. These items need to be addressed or closely monitored during the implementation of a grant award. 

        March 20, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

        PLEASE NOTE: The registration for this workshop will not be open until Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 9:00 a.m.

  • Graduate Teaching Workshops

    The Oral Communication in Academia and Teaching Writing in the Disciplines workshops are designed to provide professional development for graduate students who will be GTAs or who wish to prepare themselves for future teaching at the college level. These sessions are facilitated by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning and the Writing Across the Curriculum program.

    All workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall room 146.

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCFStudent Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Dealing with Communication Anxiety

      • Presented by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning

        Many people deal with some level of communication anxiety when speaking in public. Whether you lead a small discussion, teach a large lecture, or present at meetings or conferences, nerves can get the best of you. We will learn some techniques to alleviate speaking anxiety and boost confidence in the classroom.

        January 23, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

    •    Writing like a Member in my Academic Field

      • Presented by Writing Across the Curriculum

        Each academic field has set guidelines for genres, purposes and varying audiences. This workshop will focus on how to guide a novice in their understanding of appropriate writing conventions by reading and analyzing subject-specific texts, practicing discipline-specific writing tasks, and helping them understand the theoretical foundations of their academic discipline in regard to written communication. 

        January 31, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

    •    Integrating Textual Sources for a Lit Review

      • Presented by Writing Across the Curriculum

        The selection of textual sources and their incorporation in evidence-based writing can present problems for aspiring academic writers. Workshop participants will learn to distinguish types of evidence relevant in their academic discipline and will be introduced to Joseph Bizup’s BEAM schema that focuses on the function of a source in a document.

        February 14, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

    •    Learning from Expert Writers

      • Presented by Writing Across the Curriculum

        The strategies writers employ to complete a major writing task differ from one academic discipline to another, and from one writing task to the next. This workshop discusses the importance of analyzing how respected writers in their discipline succeed in publishing their research.

        February 28, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

    •    Providing and Receiving Effective Feedback on Academic Writing

      • Presented by Writing Across the Curriculum

        Academic writers do not write alone. They often wish for a sympathetic reader who offers feedback on a draft or assistance during the invention or revision process. In this workshop participants will learn how to approach feedback loops by planning the writing process, articulating written comments that promote critical thinking, and the role of assignments and rubrics.

        March 21, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

    •    "Writing to Learn" and "Learning to Write": Two Strategies on the Road to Expertise

      • Presented by Writing Across the Curriculum

        While writing facilitates learning effectively, it also serves a means for a writer to become an expert in their field. Writing studies have shown how low stakes writing helps writers to learn constructed domain knowledge in their academic field, provided that writers practice short, informal writing tasks that will encourage them to focus their attention on a particular aspect of the research at hand. This workshop will explore how informal writing tasks in participants’ disciplines can enhance their academic writing skills.

        April 4, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

    •    Graduate Teaching Information

      • Most programs offer assistantships in which students serve as a research or teaching associate or assistant. Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) may be appointed as classroom teachers (instructors of record), co-teachers or classroom assistants, graders, lab assistants, or other roles directly related to classroom instruction. Please see our Graduate Teaching (GTA) Information page for additional details.

        GTA training information is available on our GTA Training Requirements page. This training mainly involves self-paced online modules and there is no cost to students. While it’s primarily intended to prepare graduate students to teach at UCF, it is beneficial to any graduate student who may teach in various contexts in their future positions.

    •    Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program

      • The Karen L. Smith Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning offers a Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program every semester. This is a voluntary program on teaching in higher education, primarily intended for graduate teaching assistants but open to all UCF graduate students. The format for this program is mixed-mode. Participants will be expected to complete a series of online modules and attend six, two-hour meetings, which will be held on the Orlando campus. Participation is limited, so please enroll early. There is no cost associated with registration.
  • Professional Development Workshops

    Partnering with Career Services, we offer workshops to prepare you for life after graduation. These workshops include career support, resume assistance and the annual Graduate Career Development Symposium in the spring.

    All workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall room 146.

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCFStudent Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Lacking Experience or Changing Careers? Combination Resumes That Work

      • A combination resume is an excellent resume format for students who are changing careers and for students who don’t have significant experience in their field of interest.  Learn strategies to develop a combination resume that highlights your transferable skills and accomplishments. 

        January 18, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
        March 8, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    Doing Research That Matters

      • This workshop describes how to improve the impact of your research by anticipating the markets and value for your ideas and innovations.  These insights help researchers attract grants, institutional support, and commercial investment.

        January 24, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

    •    What is a CV?

      • How does a CV differ from a resume? Techniques to target academic and professional positions will be discussed. Discover the components and formats to create a document that effectively communicates your professional background. 

        February 1, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
        March 22, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    Smart Answers to Tough Questions: Advanced Interviewing

      • Distinguish between what the employer is asking and what the employer really wants to know! Develop strategies that will help you answer tough behavior based questions.          

        March 1, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
        April 5, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    How It Works for You: Networking Techniques

      • Overcome fears and anxiety related to networking by using outcome based thinking. Learn what to do before, during and after a networking event.

        February 8, 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

    •    Create a Professional Portfolio

      • Understand the importance of showcasing your skills, experiences and accomplishments through the use of a portfolio.  Compare the advantages of both a hard copy and an electronic portfolio. 

        April 19, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    The Academic Job Search

      • Are you prepared to begin the job search process? This workshop will provide a comprehensive overview of the academic job search. We will discuss the job search timeline, pre-application and application process, as well as expectations of faculty interviews.

        February 15, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    Social Networking

      • Take your job search online. Learn effective strategies for searching and networking online with systems including KnightLink, LinkedIn, and other social networking sites.

        February 22, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
        March 29, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    Live, Learn and Work Overseas: Peace Corps Information Session

      • Live, Learn, and Work with a Community Overseas. Change lives, including your own, by serving in the Peace Corps. You will make a difference for a community in need, gain cross-cultural skills and field experience for your career, and bring your global perspective back home to share with others. Join us at this information session with Peace Corps Campus Recruiter Brittany Libbey to learn about Volunteer experiences, have your questions answered, and gain tips to guide you through the application process.

        March 7, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

  • Personal Development Workshops

    Through the collaboration of several offices on campus and in the community, we have organized workshops focused on graduate student needs. These include personal finance management, ways to battle common stressors facing graduate students, and time management.

    Unless noted otherwise, all workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall room 146.

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCFStudent Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Time Management: Strategies for Personal and Academic Success as a Graduate Student

      • Managing your use of time is a key to living a successful, productive, and happy life! This presentation will address specific time management strategies including planning, balancing activities, setting priorities, making a schedule to fit all that you have to do and want to do as a graduate student, and other useful tips for making the most of your time. 

        February 2, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Strategies for Graduate Students to Manage Stress

      • Feeling stressed with life as a graduate student? This session will offer an interactive presentation on stress management. The presentation will cover the definition, causes and signs of stress. Stress remedies will also be reviewed. Time will be allotted for questions and answers. 

        February 8, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Building a Successful Budget

      • Presented by Fairwinds Credit Union

        Learn to make the most of your money, the importance of emergency funds, how to save for a future expense, and know about Paying Yourself first. 

        January 30, 4:00 p.m.  5:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Understand Your Credit: Your New GPA

      • Presented by Fairwinds Credit Union

        What does it take to earn a high credit score, what actually affects your credit, who’s looking at it? Find out about the myths involving your credit score and how to build and maintain successful credit. 

        February 27, 4:00 p.m.  5:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146


 

The University of Central Florida is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) to award degrees at the associate, baccalaureate, master’s, specialist, and doctoral levels. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of the University of Central Florida.

Please note the commission's expectation that contact occur only if there is evidence to support significant non-compliance with a requirement or standard. For other information about UCF’s SACSCOC accreditation, please contact the university's SACSCOC liaison in UCF's Office of Academic Affairs.

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