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  • Workshop Descriptions

    The categories below can be expanded to display the full workshop descriptions for the Pathways to Success program.

     

  • Research Workshops

    These workshops focus on supporting graduate students who are conducting research and producing research papers, theses and dissertations. Collaborating with the library, we offer workshops that will prepare you to write that next paper, from using online library tools to formatting your thesis or dissertation. Additional workshops guide students in applying for graduate research fellowships, presenting and publishing their work, optimizing their online presence, and other topics important for successful researchers.

    Workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall (CNH) room 146 or the John C. Hitt Library room 235A

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCF Student Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Library Research and Literature Review Strategies

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries 

        What strategies are you using to conduct library research? This session highlights effective strategies to locate sources for literature reviews and projects and tips for using citation tracking features, creating alerts to stay updated on publications, and customizing Google Scholar options. An overview of organizing sources using Mendeley and Zotero citation management tools will also be included. Please bring your laptop if you would like to work along with the presentation.

        September 13, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        October 24, 3:00 p.m. ­– 4:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        November 2, 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Show Me the Money: Identifying and Applying for Graduate Research Fellowships

      • Learn what it takes to get various funding agencies to show you the money, such as fellowships and other major awards. After taking this session you’ll know how to apply and when, how to compile a strong application including your personal statement and research plan, and finally, we’ll provide you with additional resources needed to take advantage of these opportunities. Don’t let the upcoming application deadlines pass you by!  

        September 11, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        October 9, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Where to Publish and Author Rights

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries 

        How do you decide which journals are a best fit for your manuscript? Do you know that all rights to a work are often assigned to publishers when a manuscript is accepted? Learn to be a savvy author! This two-part workshop will cover criteria to consider when planning where to submit your work for publication and basic information about copyright as it pertains to publishing. In Where to Publish we will look at factors like acceptance rates, audience, indexing, cost to publish and open access, among others. The Author Rights section will discuss how author rights are a bundle of rights that may be negotiated by the author. Please bring your laptop if you would like to follow along with the presentation.

        September 28, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        October 18, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        November 7, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Optimizing Your Online Presence

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries 

        Join us for this two in one workshop to learn more about evaluating research impacts and managing your online research profile.

        Part 1: Citation Metrics & Measuring Impact: Citation metrics provide quantitative data used to evaluate the impact of a scholar’s research. Several methods and tools exist to assist scholars with obtaining information about citation counts and impact data, such as ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, and other citation counting tools by discipline. Metrics also assist scholars with identifying key journals and notable researchers in their field. 

        Part 2: Managing Researcher Profiles: In part two of the workshop we’ll discuss why it’s important to develop an online profile as a researcher, how to promote your work and connect to other researchers, and look at several sites in depth. See what ORCID, LinkedIn, Research Gate, Academia.edu, PIVOT, Plum Analytics, and Google Scholar can do for you. 

        Please bring your laptop if you would like to follow along with the presentation.

        September 28, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        October 19, 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        November 14, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Beginning the Thesis or Dissertation

      • Presented by the College of Graduate Studies

        This workshop is intended for graduate students in their first or second term after enrolling in thesis or dissertation hours. Attendees will learn essential information on the entire thesis and dissertation process including the role of the advisory committee, research organization, conducting human subjects research, copyright issues, publishing, formatting requirements, campus resources. 

        September 21, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Completing the Thesis or Dissertation

      • Presented by the College of Graduate Studies

        This question and answer session is intended for graduate students in their final term. Prior to attending, students should review the Thesis and Dissertation Webcourse and prepare any questions related to this information and bring them to the workshop. Following the workshop, attendees will understand all of the steps needed to complete the thesis or dissertation process.

        September 19, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Thesis or Dissertation Formatting Using Microsoft Word's Hidden Tools

      • Presented by the College of Graduate Studies

        Attend this workshop to learn tips and pitfalls involved with using Microsoft Word to format an electronic thesis or dissertation. Participants will be shown a demonstration of how to use the following Microsoft Word functions: styles for headings and subheadings, captions for figures and tables, page numbering, automatic generation of the Table of Contents and List of Figures/Tables, converting to PDF with bookmarks. 

        September 19, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        September 21, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Endnote and RefWorks: Citing Made Easy!

      • Citation Management Tools allow you to dedicate more time to research! Join us for a hands-on session where you learn how to export citations from library databases, organize citations, generate bibliographies, and format citations in a Word document. Endnote & RefWorks can help make managing your references and formatting citations easy! All sessions cover both tools. Please bring your own laptop if you would like to follow along with the presentation.

        September 8, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        September 14, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        September 19, 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        September 29, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        October 2, 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

    •    Useful Apps All Grad Students Should Love and Use

      • Presented by the UCF Libraries

        Do you ever wonder if there is a great app out there that you are missing out on? Need help staying organized, taking notes, or need a better way to communicate with classmates over shared projects? Well look no further as this session will introduce helpful and important apps that all grad students should love and use! We will cover organization, project management, reference, and science apps that will keep you at your best while you are in grad school and beyond. Please bring your mobile device or laptop as we test drive the apps during the presentation.

        September 14, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        October 24, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146
        November 16, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Colbourn Hall 146

  • Academic Integrity

    A series of workshops encouraging academic integrity and responsible conduct of research are available to all graduate students. These workshops include the required face-to-face training for incoming doctoral students and the online CITI Responsible Conduct of Research Training Module.

    All workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall room 146.

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCFStudent Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Doing the Right Thing: What Every Graduate Student Should Know About Research Misconduct

      • Dr. Stephen Kuebler – Department of Chemistry

        CORE WORKSHOP

        In this session students will learn the 12 core areas of responsible conduct of research (RCR).  The core areas will be explored using a combination of case studies and facilitated discussion.  Emphasis will be placed on recognizing the historical foundations of RCR within the broader landscape of ethics.  Students will learn how to leverage communication and disclosure for the ethical and responsible conduct of research.

        August 29, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
        September 27, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
        October 19, 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

    •    Authorship, Credit and Collaborative Scholarship and Research: Ethical Pitfalls to Avoid

      • Dr. Steffen Guenzel - Writing and Rhetoric
        Dr. Andrew Randall - Civil Engineering

        CORE WORKSHOP

        This workshop will help to clarify rules governing authorship of peer-reviewed publications, with particular focus on archival journals. We will identify issues and decision making with respect to authorship through the instructor’s personal experiences and example case studies. 

        September 13, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Randall)
        September 25, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. (Guenzel)
        October 4, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Randall)
        October 25, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. (Guenzel)
        November 1, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Randall)

    •    Data Management: Perils of Fabrication, Falsification, and Confidentiality

      • Dr. Mark Johnson - Department of Statistics 

        CORE WORKSHOP

        This workshop addresses research misconduct in the form of fabrication of data or experimental outcomes, falsifying data or originality of material (e.g., plagiarism) and breech of confidentially of data as it relates to human subjects or contractual obligations. An historical perspective is given to highlight some infamous examples of misconduct and the ensuing scandals when they were publicized. Some mechanisms for discovery of bogus data will be noted to suggest that ultimately research misconduct will likely be discovered. Some long-term consequences of research misconduct will be identified that demonstrates the paramount importance of maintaining data integrity. 

        September 15, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 
        October 3, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. 
        November 3, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
        November 27, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

    •    Ethics: Personal Integrity as a Graduate Student

      • Dr. Nancy Stanlick - Department of Philosophy 

        CORE WORKSHOP

        This workshop is an examination of relevant issues involved in the concept of "integrity" in one's role as a graduate student. Among the issues discussed are professional codes of conduct the meaning of "honor" and personal responsibility. 

        September 20, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
        November 29, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

    •    Intellectual and Other Conflicts of Interest: Your Rights and Responsibilities

      • Douglas Backman - Office of Research and Commercialization 

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        This workshop addresses the various conflicts of interest encountered by faculty during their academic and research tenure. The session will address conflicts of interest between faculty and students, financial conflicts of interests related to sponsored research and conflicts of commitments related to faculty members institutional assignments and their private business or consulting activity. The objective of the session is to make the student aware of the various types of conflicts of interests and the student’s role and responsibilities in mitigating such conflicts. The session will use directed learning and case studies to facilitate decision making scenarios. 

        September 20, 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

    •    Ethical and Legal Issues in Teaching

      • Dr. Jonathan Beever - Department of Philosophy

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        A discussion of various issues that may and do arise in college and university-level teaching, including disruptive student behaviour, academic dishonesty, FERPA, your responsibilities as an instructor or Teaching Assistant. Also included as a central feature is the place of the UCF Creed and UCF Golden Rule as guiding principles.

        September 6 – Graduate Student Center Presentation Room, 146 Colbourn Hall – 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
        November 15 – Graduate Student Center Presentation Room, 146 Colbourn Hall – 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

    •    Intellectual Property Rights

      • John Miner - Office of Research and Commercialization 

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        John Miner from the Office of Research and Commercialization will present this seminar which will address intellectual property rights specifically concerning graduate students and post-doctoral fellows.  

        October 27, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
        November 9, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

    •    How Diverse Attitudes and Perspectives Can Affect You in the Classroom and Workplace

      • Barbara Thompson - Office of Diversity and Inclusion  

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        In the classroom and workplace, situations involving aspects of human diversity may arise that require each of us to reflect on our own biases. This workshop encourages participants to push their views on personal and professional integrity and ethical decision making to their limits. Bring with you flexibility of thought and openness to different attitudes and perspectives as we discuss some challenging scenarios that ask us to decide what is the “right thing to do.”  

        November 14, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

    •    Ethical Decision Making in Graduate School and Beyond

      • Jennifer Wright - Office of Integrity and Ethical Development  

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        Actions taken as a result of a decision made reflects one’s values and principles. Inherently, we know what is right and wrong behavior but do we understand how others judge right and wrong behavior. This seminar will provide problem-solving methods and critical questioning techniques associated with the practice of ethical decision making. During the seminar, participants will have an opportunity to strengthen one’s principles of professional conduct to be able to practice living by a set of ethical standards. 

        September 28, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
        October 10, 4:00 p.m.  – 6:00 p.m.
        October 11, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

    •    A Practical Guide to Preventing Plagiarism

      • Douglas Backman - Office of Research and Commercialization 

        ELECTIVE WORKSHOP

        This session will outline ethical writing guidelines and define commonly found plagiarism practices. The student will gain an understanding on how to prevent plagiarizing another person’s work and learn the proper use of citations when drafting research papers and journals.

        October 18, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  • Graduate Teaching Workshops

    The Oral Communication in Academia and Teaching Writing in the Disciplines workshops are designed to provide professional development for graduate students who will be GTAs or who wish to prepare themselves for future teaching at the college level. These sessions are facilitated by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning and the Writing Across the Curriculum program.

    All workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall room 146.

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCFStudent Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Dealing with Communication Anxiety

      • Presented by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning

        Many people deal with some level of communication anxiety when speaking in public. Whether you lead a small discussion, teach a large lecture, or present at meetings or conferences, nerves can get the best of you. We will learn some techniques to alleviate speaking anxiety and boost confidence in the classroom.

        September 22, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. 

    •    Developing Your Teaching Persona

      • Presented by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning

        Have you considered how you want to be perceived by students in the classroom? How will you know if you have reached your objectives in that area? Instructors should not be replicas of one model, and in this workshop we will identify individual strengths in order to develop our own unique instructor personas.

        October 20, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. 

    •    Next Level PowerPoint

      • Presented by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning

        Students have become used to having slides as part of their classroom experience. However, these visual aids can detract from the message you are trying to convey to your class and affect your perceived credibility. Attend this workshop to learn the principles of effective Power Point creation that will take your teaching to the next level.

        November 17, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. 

    •    Writing like a Member in my Academic Field

      • Each academic field has set guidelines for genres, purposes and varying audiences. This workshop will focus on how to guide a novice in their understanding of appropriate writing conventions by reading and analyzing subject-specific texts, practicing discipline-specific writing tasks, and helping them understand the theoretical foundations of their academic discipline in regard to written communication. 

        September 6, 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

    •    Integrating Textual Sources for a Lit Review

      • The selection of textual sources and their incorporation in evidence-based writing can present problems for aspiring academic writers. Workshop participants will learn to distinguish types of evidence relevant in their academic discipline and will be introduced to Joseph Bizup’s BEAM schema that focuses on the function of a source in a document. 

        September 20, 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

    •    Learning from Expert Writers

      •  

        The strategies writers employ to complete a major writing task differ from one academic discipline to another, and from one writing task to the next. This workshop discusses the importance of analyzing how respected writers in their discipline succeed in publishing their research. 

        October 4, 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

    •    Providing and Receiving Effective Feedback on Academic Writing

      • Academic writers do not write alone. They often wish for a sympathetic reader who offers feedback on a draft or assistance during the invention or revision process. In this workshop participants will learn how to approach feedback loops by planning the writing process, articulating written comments that promote critical thinking, and the role of assignments and rubrics. 

        October 25, 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

    •    "Writing to Learn” and “Learning to Write”: Two Strategies on the Road to Expertise

      • While writing facilitates learning effectively, it also serves a means for a writer to become an expert in their field. Writing studies have shown how low stakes writing helps writers to learn constructed domain knowledge in their academic field, provided that writers practice short, informal writing tasks that will encourage them to focus their attention on a particular aspect of the research at hand. This workshop will explore how informal writing tasks in participants’ disciplines can enhance their academic writing skills. 

        November 8, 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

    •    Graduate Teaching Information

      • Most programs offer assistantships in which students serve as a research or teaching associate or assistant. Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) may be appointed as classroom teachers (instructors of record), co-teachers or classroom assistants, graders, lab assistants, or other roles directly related to classroom instruction. Please see our Graduate Teaching (GTA) Information page for additional details.

        GTA training information is available on our GTA Training Requirements page. This training mainly involves self-paced online modules and there is no cost to students. While it’s primarily intended to prepare graduate students to teach at UCF, it is beneficial to any graduate student who may teach in various contexts in their future positions.

    •    Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program

      • The Karen L. Smith Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning offers a Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program every semester. This is a voluntary program on teaching in higher education, primarily intended for graduate teaching assistants but open to all UCF graduate students. The format for this program is mixed-mode. Participants will be expected to complete a series of online modules and attend six, two-hour meetings, which will be held on the Orlando campus. Participation is limited, so please enroll early. There is no cost associated with registration.
  • Professional Development Workshops

    Partnering with Career Services, we offer workshops to prepare you for life after graduation. These workshops include career support, resume assistance and the annual Graduate Career Development Symposium in the spring.

    All workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall room 146.

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCFStudent Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Lacking Experience or Changing Careers? Combination Resumes That Work

      • A combination resume is an excellent resume format for students who are changing careers and for students who don’t have significant experience in their field of interest.  Learn strategies to develop a combination resume that highlights your transferable skills and accomplishments. 

        August 30, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
        October 17, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    What is a CV?

      • How does a CV differ from a resume? Techniques to target academic and professional positions will be discussed. Discover the components and formats to create a document that effectively communicates your professional background. 

        September 6, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
        October 25, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    Smart Answers to Tough Questions: Advanced Interviewing

      • Distinguish between what the employer is asking and what the employer really wants to know! Develop strategies that will help you answer tough behavior based questions.          

        October 4, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
        November 8, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    How It Works for You: Networking Techniques

      • Overcome fears and anxiety related to networking by using outcome based thinking. Learn what to do before, during and after a networking event.

        September 13, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
        November 1, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    Create a Professional Portfolio

      • Understand the importance of showcasing your skills, experiences and accomplishments through the use of a portfolio.  Compare the advantages of both a hard copy and an electronic portfolio. 

        November 29, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    The Academic Job Search

      • Are you prepared to begin the job search process? This workshop will provide a comprehensive overview of the academic job search. We will discuss the job search timeline, pre-application and application process, as well as expectations of faculty interviews.

        September 19, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    Social Networking

      • Take your job search online. Learn effective strategies for searching and networking online with systems including KnightLink, LinkedIn, and other social networking sites.

        September 27, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
        November 15, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

    •    Doing Research that Matters

      • This workshop describes how to improve the impact of your research by anticipating the markets and value for your ideas and innovations. These insights help researchers attract grants, institutional support, and commercial investment.

        October 10, 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. 

  • Personal Development Workshops

    Through the collaboration of several offices on campus and in the community, we have organized workshops focused on graduate student needs. These include personal finance management, ways to battle common stressors facing graduate students, and time management.

    Unless noted otherwise, all workshops will be held in the Graduate Student Center located in Colbourn Hall room 146.

    Students must to register for these workshops through their myUCFStudent Center under Graduate Students then Pathways to Success. Please see our Pathways to Success Workshop Registration Instructions. Please email  gradworkshops@ucf.edu with any questions.

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    •    Building a Successful Budget

      • Presented by Fairwinds Credit Union

        Learn to make the most of your money, the importance of emergency funds, how to save for a future expense, and know about Paying Yourself first. 

        September 11, 4:00 p.m.  5:00 p.m. 

    •    Understand your Credit- Your New GPA

      • What does it take to earn a high credit score, what actually affects your credit, who’s looking at it? Find out about the myths involving your credit score and how to build and maintain successful credit.

        October 16, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

    •    Time Management: Strategies for Personal and Academic Success as a Graduate Student

      • Managing your use of time is a key to living a successful, productive, and happy life! This presentation will address specific time management strategies including planning, balancing activities, setting priorities, making a schedule to fit all that you have to do and want to do as a graduate student, and other useful tips for making the most of your time.  

        September 27, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 

    •    Strategies for Graduate Students to Manage Stress

      • Feeling stressed with life as a graduate student?  This session will offer an interactive presentation on stress management.  The presentation will cover the definition, causes and signs of stress.  Stress remedies will also be reviewed.  Time will be allotted for questions and answers.  

        October 11, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 


 

 
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